"And, when you want something, the entire Universe conspires in helping you to achieve it." -The Alchemist, by Paulo Coehlo



Friday, July 10, 2015

She's Home!

Lily was discharged from New Bolton yesterday and we arrived back in MD with Lily at around 6:00 pm. There will be a full update later. All the news is good!

At the New Bolton parking lot, getting her ready to go.
She was good but SO fidgety: she literally went, "OMG OUTSIDE!"
Charles had to hold her so I could wrap her other hind!
And yes, she lost some weight during her hospitalization despite free choice lovely green timothy hay and 2 lbs of grain 3 times a day. I was not surprised: she is a quiet stresser. We have UlcerGard ready to go at home...
One antibiotic dose. She's on minocycline twice a day.
In the stall where she will live for the first 2 weeks of her month-long recovery.
(She will go in a stall with an attached run for the second two weeks)
Inside of the stall. She will have a neighbor in the stall on the right during the day.
Front of the stall.
The stalls here are lovely.
Stall board at this farm is what field board costs at a lot of places in Montgomery County. 
Eating from the built-in hay feeder.
She gets free-choice hay.
She can look out of those top windows...

...to see this. This is the shelter for the gelding field. During the day when it's hot and when it rains at night, they take cover here, so she will have horses she can see always.
Paddock that opens out into the gelding field. It's open so they can come in and out as needed.
I chose that stall on purpose: it's the one stall in the barn where she both has a neighbor and can see the horses in the field next to her. Hopefully she stays calm. She has historically stressed out when horses get turned out: this is the best we can do at the moment. She will have a better view of other horses once she can be moved to the stall with the run. 

Update to follow on what the surgeon said and what the leg looks like under the bandage. 

19 comments:

  1. I had to give those pills to my herd for an entire month this Spring when treating for Lyme. My horse ate them in her food with no problem, but the donkeys said "no way!" This is what I came up with to feed them, maybe it will be of use to you:

    http://thedancingdonkey.blogspot.com/2015/04/culinary-arts.html

    I am glad she is home and I hope for a speedy and full recovery.

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    1. Your trick is BRILLIANT!! Wow! I never in a million years would have thought of that one...I'm going to try to finagle something similar with apples. She likes apples better than carrots.

      THANK YOU so much for sharing that, Dancing Donkey!

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  2. what a relief to have her home! and hopefully the stall works out for her. my mare is traditionally terrible in a stall (even for brief periods) but was stoic enough when on stall rest earlier this year.

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    1. Me too! As is turns out, she's only really going to be about 10 days in the stall based on the specific dates Dr. S wants the sutures taken out. So it won't be too long before she has more room to move around in!

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  3. I'm sure you're so happy to have her home! I hope the stall works out well for her!

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  4. I'm so happy she's home, sounds like you have a good plan for managing stall board :)

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    1. Hoping she stays calm and eats like she is supposed to. :)

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  5. So glad she is home, and what a lovely stall. I hope she continues to improve and takes her medicine (that's A LOT of pills) like a good girl!

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    1. Thank you irish! She LOVES Stud Muffins, which work great for hiding pills. They have worked in the past; I just hope they continue to work! The Dancing Donkey's trick will be a nice backup to have. :)

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  6. That stall is gorgeous!! It is so hard to keep a herd animal separated and not stressed out. I hope she calms down and settles in quickly for you. Even having lost a bit of weight she still looks really good. Nice muscling and she will regain quickly. Continuing to send happy thoughts!!!

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    1. Thank you so much Sara! And yes, it is so hard with herd animals. I have the option of putting Gracie next to Lily at night, but I'm trying to avoid it if I can. Gracie stocks up horribly when in a stall, and it's just a whole other set of issues...hopefully Lily can tolerate 10 more days of this.

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  7. So glad she is home and doing well!

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  8. I'm so glad she is home and doing well!!! I hope she doesn't stress too much. You can do it Lily!!!

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  9. So wonderful that she is home! Maybe Nimo can give her a kiss tomorrow to cheer her up!:)

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  10. I am so so relieved she's home <3 Give that sweet girl some extra kisses from me.

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  11. Woo hoo!! Welcome home Lily!!

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