"And, when you want something, the entire Universe conspires in helping you to achieve it." -The Alchemist, by Paulo Coehlo



Wednesday, May 27, 2015

WW: "Gaited Horses Can't Jump"








I beg to differ. :)

* Yes, she was warmed up w/t/c prior to being longed over this fence.
** We started smaller and went up to this height. Yes, I realize she doesn't have tight knees yadda-yadda. We're not going for shows; I'm just proving a point. ;)
*** No more than 3x over the fence in each direction: she has ringbone in her RF after all. These are all video stills.
**** Gracie enjoys jumping; this is not the first time we do this. I do a lot of interval-type training on the longe, either agility work over poles or longing on the side of the hill in the mare field because it's great cross-training. Every once in a while I'll raise the poles to small jumps for the cardio workout, like on this day. Lily was jumping 3'6" on the longe on this day (no, not "small jumps" in her case; I *wanted* her to crack her back over the jumps, which she did. Lily has awesome scope and a picture-perfect bascule). The highest I'll ask Gracie to jump is what you see in these photos, maybe 2'3". 
***** For the record, at the barn where I learned to jump in PR one of the best jumpers in the lesson program was a gaited gray mare, a Paso mix that looked just like a TB...until she moved. She had no trot, just a pace, a rack, and a very lateral, smooth canter. She could jump up to 3' from a standstill. Most of the little kids learned to jump on her because she was such a steady-Eddy + so comfortable to ride. Brave as fuck; she was always in the ribbons at jumper and equitation shows. She didn't know what "refusal" meant. Her name was Ceniza, which means "Ash" in Spanish.

16 comments:

  1. We had a saddlebred in training for a while that was such a nice jumping mare :)

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    1. Saddlebreds make great jumpers!! I've heard of several that were wonderfully talented over fences!

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  2. Ashke can jump a ground pole. And we have done a straw bale without him tossing me. :)

    Gracie looks amazing. You do such a great job with her.

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    1. Jumping is jumping! ;)

      Thanks Karen!

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  3. I've never understood why people think that gaited horses can't jump, but it's a very popular misconception. The other one I hear all the time is that gaited horses can't canter. No clue where that one comes from, either. People seem to view gaited horses as some sort of mythical beast instead of as real horses!

    Gracie looks like she's having a blast!

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    1. Exactly! Thank you Shannon!

      Traditionally, Paso Finos were taught to jump back on the island. Like most gaited breeds, they were originally bred as all-around working horses so naturally they were expected to be able to do a little bit of everything, including jumping. I've never understood why so many people think they can't jump...or canter!

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  4. She looks really great :) There's a TWH gelding at my old barn that went over (no joke, we measured it) a 7 foot long, 4+ foot high fallen limb in the pasture. They were all galloping and playing, and boom, he goes over it. We just kind of stood there like "What just happened?"

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    1. That's AWESOME Kalin!

      We discovered my Paso enjoyed it when he randomly leaped over a stack of hay bales that we were unloading at the barn back home!

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  5. Gaited horses most certainly can jump! I had a TWH once that could jump beautifully (and he was 100% gaited... never once trotted). Gracie looks great!

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  6. You've seen Queenie jump--usually when I least expect it!!

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    1. Indeed! And she has a very nice jump!

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